H488 California History  
     

 


 
Assignment
% Grade Due Dates

Participation in Assigned Discussions

120 pts/15%

___________Your Assigned Date

___________/ 100 pts

Four Reading Quizzes

160 pts/ 20 %

(100 pts Each)

Wks 3, 6, 11, & 14

#1_______/ 40 pts & #2_______/ 40 pts

#1_______/ 40 pts & #2_______/ 40 pts

Two Midterms

(Class Themes & Reading)

320/ 40 %

Wks 8 & Finals' Week

MT #1_____/ 160 pts & MT #2_____/ 160 pts

One 8-10 Page Essay
200/ 25 %

(use the History Department Writing Center)

Proposal_______/ 40 pts due by Week 5, Thursday

Essay _______/ 160 pts due by Week 14 or earlier

800 pts/ 100 %
_________pts/ 800; ______%; ______Grade in Class

Total 800 points: 93% A; 90 % A-; 87 % B+; 83% B; 80 % B-; 77% C+; 73% C; 70 % C-; 67% D+; 63 % D; 60 % D-; 59% F

There are NO MAKE-UP EXAMS and NO MAKE-UP DISCUSSION DATES. Late papers will automatically have points deducted, exponentially after one week. Please turn-in only your work done for this class. Students who turn in plagiarized papers or work will automatically fail the class, with letters sent to the dean of students. On the other hand, your diligent, honest work will result in improvement, intellectual growth, and the possibility of sophisticated arguments and ideas. A significant portion of the exams will come from class lectures and discussions, along with the reading. Coming to class will significantly increase your chances of passing.

Please, be respectful of others. Arrive on time, be here "in the moment" by listening, commenting, and taking notes--no texting or emailing or watching feature movies on your computer! I will allow for breaks, so please be patient.  Come see me with any questions or problems early in the term so I can help you to address them. 

The History Department has a Writing Help Center, and you can make an appointment before you paper is due by calling the department (677-3566). I recommend that you plan ahead.  After you email your draft to the tutor, they will read over and edit your essay so they can discuss it with you at your appointment--even if you don't have a draft, show up for your appointment and they will help you begin your paper.  Additionally, CSUN has a variety of truly excellent programs and centers designed to help you accomplish your best work, and to improve critical skills each semester (take a look at our website, or just ask).

______________________

Guidelines

1-Discussion Questions: By the fourth week, students will be assigned the task of organizing weekly discussion questions. To prepare for discussions:

1-You should each do ALL of the reading, with the rest of the class. 

2-For each reading, write 2 to 5 Questions that you feel best cover the main themes and points of significance.  These should be thoughtful questions that you feel BEST reflect the points we should take from the reading.

3-After completing the reading and the questions for each, taking into account all of the readings, write 2-4 questions that BEST cover the week's overarching themes.

This is a process.  First, become conversant with each article or reading, and then think about the overall themes suggested by the readings together--what 2-4 questions best cover ALL OF THE READING.  The idea is to build some general themes based on each of the readings.  In 40 to 50 minutes, we will not have time to address all aspects of individual readings. The idea is to ask the class larger thematic questions that they can answer with specific examples from the reading.

Your job is to get the class to address the week's major themes, along with with significant examples, and although you will have your own developed answer, it is not your burden to carry the discussion--that is the job of the class.

4-TYPE YOUR QUESTIONS:  Include your name, class and date at the top.  Type your week at the top, along with the week's reading for which you have written up questions.  Then list your questions for specific works, and list your 2-4 general questions at the bottom.  Label the questions appropriately, and single or double space (no triple + spacing).  Sample below--you can turn these in during class, after the discussion.

H488                   
Name                  
22 Feb 18                  
Class Discussion #1                  

Reading: William Deverrell, “The 1850s;” Douglas Cazaux Sackman, “Nature and Conquest: After the Deluge;” and William Bauer, Jr., “Native Californians in the Nineteenth Century,” Companion to California History, pp. 159-191 & 192-214. Smith, Freedom’s Frontier, pp. 47-140.

Questions for Individual Readings 
(Deverell)
1-
2- etc.

(Sackman)
1-
2-  etc.

(Bauer)
1-
2-  etc.

(Smith, pp. 47-140)
1-
2-  etc.

Thematic Questions for Week 4
(engaging, thoughtful questions that address the week's themes, based on individual readings, 2-5 Questions)
1-
2-
3-
4-
5-

5-Meet with your group BEFORE class to discuss which ones of your general overall questions would best cover ALL OF THE READING.

6-Type up a class discussion guide with your group's names, the date, your week's reading listed at the top, and then a listing of 3-5 Questions that will best address the week's reading and enable your classmates to answer with examples from specific readings.  Your list of the week's readings at the top will help students to remember what was read.  Sample below--one of you should email me the master discussion questions, below, the day before the discussion so I can copy it for the class.

H488                                              
Armen, Dalton, Sam
22 Feb 18
Class Discussion #1

Reading: William Deverrell, “The 1850s;” Douglas Cazaux Sackman, “Nature and Conquest: After the Deluge;” and William Bauer, Jr., “Native Californians in the Nineteenth Century,” Companion to California History, pp. 159-191 & 192-214. Smith, Freedom’s Frontier, pp. 47-140.

Thematic Questions for Week 4
(engaging, thoughtful questions that address the week's themes, based on individual readings, 2-5 Questions)
1-
2-
3-
4-
5-

2-Reading Quizzes:  There will be four reading quizzes, based on reading and class discussion.  They will be in essay format, in Weeks 3, 6, 11, and 14.  (The Midterms, given in Weeks eight and sixteen, will also include reading questions)  The quizzes will be in short answer essay format, and will address major themes and examples.

3-Two Midterms:  The Midterms will include matching questions to address any material covered in class lectures and discussions, along with essay questions reflecting the themes of the class. They will also include short answer essay questions addressing the reading, based on weekly study questions.  The Midterms will be given in Weeks Eight and Sixteen (finals’ week). 

4-One 8-10 page Essay.  This is a term research paper--follow your curiosity, ask a question, and devise a way of answering it. For example, if you want to know more about Native Californian land use, you could look at Chumash spiritual practices or Costonoan material culture. You can analyze primary sources or answer your question with secondary sources, or use a combination of both. You should read ONE extra book for your paper, and then add class sources to support and contextualize your essay with the broader lines of California's history. Follow your interests, develop a biliography, then settle down to a book that you find most insightful.

Proposal Due Week Five:

1) QUESTION: Put your question at the top, and below it, explain your curiosity, briefly introduce the topic in a couple paragraphs.

2) METHOD: Simply explain how you will answer your question. For example, I will answer my question with biography, or for example, "I am going to gain insight into the daily life of gold miners by reading the letters of 'Dame Shirley,'" or "I will understand life in the Gold Rush mines via three first person accounts found in the Library of Congress collection, 'California As I saw It.'"

3) Bibliography: List 8-10 of the best sources for your topic, and put them in proper bibliographic form. (Please see the Purdue Owl "Sample Paper," at the end of it, there is a proper bibliography https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/11/ )

4) HYPOTHESIS: What do you expect to find? Be sure to expand on the ideas you have now--for example, "I expect to find that Gold Rush mining was more difficult that people expected, and that additionally, there was tension and conflict." Spell out and explain exactly what you think you will find, and why, explain. This is your "educated guess," write down exactly what you are thinking.

Your Paper is Due by Week Fourteen, before Thanksgiving Break. These are formal essays, so please include Chicago styled reference notes and bibliography.  Please see the “Quick Guide” to The Chicago Manual of Style Online, and use the “Notes and Bibliography Style” (http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html ).  You might also use the Purdue OWL, a site that includes a sample paper: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/11/ . The Purdue Owl provides a wonderful sample, however, instead of notes marked with a "1."--you should use superscripts. Your word program does this automatically.

PURDUE OWL SAMPLE PAPER WITH CHICAGO STYLE REFERENCE NOTES & BIBLIOGRAPHY/ https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/11/