Assignments & Grading --Please NO Emailed Work (turn-in to Class or Office)

Requirements
% Grade
Points
Date Due

Class Participation & Presence in Seminar

Presence in Class & Weekly Essays (8 Wks)

Assigned Management of Discussion

30 %

300

240

60

Class Meetings

Class Meetings

Assigned Week

Proposal

First Proposal Paragraphs & Discussio of Ideas

Draft Proposal Due & Proposal Critique

Final Proposal

10 %

100

 

20

80

Wks 2, 3, & 4

Weeks 6 & 7

Week 8

Paper

Rough Draft & Critique

Presentation & Critique of Topics Presented in Class

Final Paper

60 %

600

50

50

500

 

Weeks 14 & 15

Assigned Day/ Both Presentation Days

Finals' Week by Wednesday, Noon, Upload Final Paper to Turn-it-in, Moodle

100 %
1000

PLEASE NOTE:

Smaller Assignments turned in late will NOT be given points; Final Proposals and Papers turned in late will have points deducted (10 points per week); Please turn in work weekly.

PLAGIARIZED WORK TURNED IN FOR ANY ASSIGNMENT WILL RESULT IN AN F IN THE CLASS & A NOTE TO THE DEAN

1-CLASS PARTICIPATION

A-PRESENCE IN CLASS AND PARTICIPATION BASED IN READING

Seminar discussion is a significant part of your grade, along with participtaion and comments based on and inspired by reading. In addition, you will write short essays based on the week's reading. You cannot pass this class if you miss more than 2 class meetings.

B-ASSIGNED MANAGEMENT OF DISCUSSION

You will be assigned a week, along with a couple others, to manage class discussion. Your role will be to organize class discussion around key points of the reading. You may present key points of the reading for structure, but your main role is to evoke class discussion.

C-CRITIQUE OF TOPICS PRESENTED IN CLASS

In the final weeks of class, students will present research findings (in progress) to our class. Each student will:

1) Present a 10-15 Presentation of your topic and findings, turning-in a brief outline with your presentation

2) Provide thoughtful and insightful critique to others in class, helping each other to write the best possible papers.

You will be graded on both.

D-PRESENTATIONS & FEEDBACK.

On your presentation day, please bring a brief outline with the following:

1-Your ORIGINAL QUESTION

2-The PRIMARY SOURCES you used

3-Your answer, your THESIS

4-An example of how your PRIMARY SOURCES prove your thesis, an example of your evidence (a quote from a document, for example)

2-PROPOSAL

A SPIFFED UP AND PROFESSIONAL QUALITY PROPOSAL. The proposal is extremely important, so spend a lot of time putting it together, on building and developing your chosen topic. First you will need to find a body of PRIMARY SOURCES which you can use to answer your question, and then you must locate the most critical secondary books and articles to your topic. Please use the following form for your proposal:

QUESTION Regarding your topic, what are you most curious about? Beginning with a general topic, it takes some work and reading to shape your question. As you read and look for possible primary sources, don't loose heart. Just keep rewriting your question until it captures exactly what you wish to know.
METHOD How can you answer your question? What primary sources can you use to answer your question? You need to design logical steps here "through" your primary sources so that when you are finished, you will be able to make some conclusions, to answer your question. For example, "how did Americans view their nation and world during the events unfolding between 1938 and 1945?" You might look for answers in the mass-circulating comic books of these years, or in film, both of which were extremely popular.

PRIMARY SOURCES

These are newspapers, magazines, diaries, letters, government documents, census data, oral histories, novels, poetry, music, paintings, etc. --these are sources contemporary with your topic of inquiry, and they can be found in archives, in books, or on the internet (for example). These are the sources that you will read and interpret, and from which you will write history.
SECONDARY SOURCES

Books written by writers, journalists, historians (generally) AFTER the era, person, or event about which you are writing. You should include:

1. Major Books (books written by writers/ historians who have studied your topic extensively)

2. Articles (JSTOR/ EBSCO Host, etc.) Find the MOST recent articles written--if there aren't any, then perhaps it has been awhile since your topic has been explored; if there is a LOT, then you will have to sort through it to find the work most appropriate for your question. BUT DO LOOK. In my experience, I find many don't work too hard to find this literature--in many cases when students have claimed they didn't find any articles, I can easily find them on the library/ via internet. SO do look carefully, okay?

Use class reading, too.

HYPOTHESIS Finally, what do you EXPECT to find? Please don't be stingy with your hypothesis. Elaborate on what you expect to find--this is an "educated guess," so use your imagination here, along with the knowledge you do have about your topic.

A-FIRST PROPOSAL PARAGRAPHS: These are not graded, but you should work on writing and revsing your proposal every week, seriously, turning it in on time for feedback. Do this and you will see your research topic become sharper and more focused.

B-DRAFT OF YOUR PROPOSAL: You will turn in a draft of your proposal. I will look them all over, and each of you will seriously critique each other's work. Consider the following in your critiques of each other's work, you will do two typed proposal critiques (be sure to make a copy for me as well as for your fellow student):

QUALITY OF QUESTION--is there a better way to ask it? Is it clear?

Do you think the question really represents what the author truly wants to know?

WILL THE METHOD AND PRIMARY SOURCES CHOSEN ADEQUATELY ANSWER THE QUESTION?

WHAT ARE POTENTIAL PROBLEMS WITH THE METHOD? DO THE SECONDARY SOURCES CHOSEN SEEM SIGNIFICANT FOR THE QUESTION?

OVERALL, WHAT ARE THE POTENTIAL PROBLEMS WITH THE OVERALL RESEARCH PLAN?

C-FINAL PROPOSAL

A revised, professional quality proposal of your research project.

You are required to turn this in on time, it is a map of your work for the semester.

3-FINAL PAPER

A-ROUGH DRAFT & PARTNER CRITIQUE

B-FINAL DRAFT

Turn in your draft on the required date. Your rough draft will be graded on the following criteria: 1) turning in your draft on time; 2) the development of your thesis; and 3) the degree of completion--how much you simply have written. Most of your Rough Draft points will go to YOUR PARTNER'S CRITIQUE. Take the time to read carefully and give feedback. You will be assigned a rough draft partner, and will be expected to critique his or her paper. You should 1) address development of paper's thesis; 2) use of primary sources; 3) organization of paper; 4) and the quality of writing.

5-FINAL DRAFT

PLEASE turn-in your final draft to the department Finals' Week.