n

 

#1/ Listening to Others (Project Design & Proposal)

Week #1: 23 January 2019

Oral Histories from Kentucky, Listening to Others, Project Design, & Interviews

Introduction to Oral History and to Class

Please see "Oral History Assignments & Grading" page for further insructions on the seminar notes. Mostly I am looking to see that you have engaged with ALL of ther reading. You might write a few notes as you are reading, a few page numbers with notable quotes, though you should read through the entire chapter or article for the main point and significant kinds of evidence used. When you read the entire article/ Chapter, then explain it in your own words, you are using two important reading techniques--in looking for the thesis argument, you are actively searching for the main ideas, and second, explaining and rephrasing the reading in your own concise words (full sentences, full paragraphs--not an outline or "list" of points), you are doing the work of reconstructing the author's ideas and you will learn much more (and remember). These brief notes should reflect an "engagement" with the ideas of these authors.

Please look at the Assignments & Grading page for more guidelines, I have a slight change here from our discussion in class. In doing this reading, we are looking for insight into the oral history process. We will know the work of Portelli and Fosl in detail, and you will want to evaluate the use of oral history in Harlan County and in Kentucky's Civil Rights' Movement. Overall, how do these projects succeed? What are their limits? Actively ask these questions, actively evaluate.You should read the oral history and writing essays to learn about the process, and to gain insights that might help in the design of your own project.

Reading:

1. Telling True Stories: "An Invitation to Narrative," 1-18: What do these master story tellers tell us are the significant elements of the narrative?

Gay Talese, David Halberstam, Katherine Boo

2. Oral History and Digital Hitory, 1-35: How have people designed oral history projects, do you find any examples in the oral history websites below?

Introduction and Oral History in the Age of Digital Posibilities

3. Portelli, They Say in Harlan County, 1-92: What is Portelli's relationship to Harlan County, why is he fascinated with Kentucky and its people? In these chapters, Portelli builds a context, understanding local legeands, family survival, slavery, and religion via interviews. After each chapter you can jot down adjectives that best describe regional characteristics in these areas, then build a larger portrait based on all of the chapters. How does Portelli characterize these people and their culture?

Harlan County, 1964-2009; A Love Story, The Bear and the Sycamore Tree, Of Hardship and Love, Wars and Peace, These Signs Shall Follow Them

4. Fosl, Freedom on the Border, Beginning to 48: What was life like for blacks in Kentucky before the Civil Rights' Movement?

Map, Chronology, Introduction, Life Under Segregation, Profile: Jesse Crenshaw

5. Oral History Websites. . . How have oral histories been used and presented?

Nunn Oral History Library/ https://kentuckyoralhistory.org/ Click Appalachia and explore the Interviews. (Look for the Portelli interviews in Harlan County, you can request these, but they aren't readily available..) Read / Listen to part of one of the interviews. Write a couple paragraphs telling us who this person was, in your own words (but don't forget birth date, place, etc., basic points of biography where possible.)

Here are a number of Oral History Projects that have benn recogized, take a look.

"In Our Own Words--The Negro Spirituals Heritage Keepers" Collection at Mills College http://www.mills.edu/news/2008/newsarticle02082008negro_spirituals.php

The Nevada Test Site Oral History Project/ http://digital.library.unlv.edu/ntsohp/ 

Muskie Oral History Project/http://digilib.bates.edu/cgi-bin/library.cgi?site=localhost&a=p&p=about&c=muskieor&l=en&w=utf-8 

"Good Work, Sister!" Women Shipyard workers of WWII: An Oral History/ http://www.goodworksister.org 

The Tuskegee Airmen Oral History Project/ http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/exhibits/tuskegee/airoverview.htm http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/jah/89.2/moye.html 

Week #2: 30 January 2019

Oral Histories from Kentucky, Listening to Others, Project Design, & Interviews

Narratives and Context: Class and Race in Twentieth Century Appalachia & Kentucky

Reading:

1. Telling True Stories, "Finding, Researching, and Reporting Topics," 19-64: How do writers find and develop their stories?

Mark Kramer and Wendy Call, Lane De Gregory, Mark Kramer, Jacqui Banazynski, Jon Franklin, Gay Taese, Isabel Wilkerson, Jon Franklin, Ted Conover, Anne Hull, Louise Kiernan, Victor Merina, Mitra Kalita, Tracy Kidder, Walt Harrington, Cynthia Gorney, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc

2. Portelli, They Say in Harlan County, 93-182: How have economy, the land, coal mining, and women defined life in Harlan county? How have struggle, relationship to the land, coal mining work, and women created a distinct culture? Are these the people that Colin Woodard describes in his description of Appalachia a one of the eleven American nations?

Flush Times and Rough Times, A Space of Their Own, Miner's Life, Identities

3. Fosl, Freedom on the Border, Beginning to 49-124: How did desegregation in education affect the ex-slave population in Kentucky? The desegregation of public accommodations? How did the struggle that defined the lives of blacks (and poor whites) change with the push to desegregate and to tear down the barriers of segregation?

Desegragation in Education, Opening Public Accomodations, Profile: Helen Fisher Frye

Discussion Leads: Zachary Harliss, Olivia Coefield, Jeff Miranda

Work Due:

1-Reading, Weeks 1 & 2 (Hereafter, each week's reading is due that week)

2-Typed Reading Summaries (See "Assignments & Grading" page)

3-Typed Project Ideas (see web page on proposals), possible people to interview? What topics are you interested in? Interesting people around you?

4-Louis B. Nunn Oral History Library -- explore the website, follow your interests, find an interview open to the public, then listen to some of it--get a feel for how to navigate the interview, look for the summary of the person's background and significance. You can read as you listen, become familar with the way the Nunn library presents these inerviews. (We will compare to others). Then in your own words, after listening to some of the interview, tell us a little about this person. Two short paragraphs will work--in the first, give us the details of birth date, region, etc., and his/ her significance. Then write a paragraph in your own words to relate your impression of this person after listening to some of the interview. (for those of you in my class last term, there are some interviews with Anne Braden, an early Civil Rights' acivist, and I believe some of them are open)

 Week #3: 6 February 2019

Oral Histories from Kentucky, Listening to Others, and Project Design

Developing Cultures (within Cultures)

Reading:

1. Telling True Stories, pp. 55-80: "Name Your Subgenre," 55-80: What are the variety of genres that writers use, which do you like best and why?

Kramer and Call, Banaszynski, Roy Peter Clark, Tomas Alex Tizon, Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Hochschild, Phillip Lopate)

2. Portelli, They Say in Harlan County, 183-248: How did miners feel about the economic situation created by the Great Depression, and how did they see the Union? How were folks from Harlan (and Appalachia) defined and stereotyped by outsiders?

No Neutrals There, God, Guns, and Guts, Harlan on Our Minds

3. Fosl, "Freedom on the Border," 125-185: How did younger blacks in Kentucky define the movement in Kentucky?

Black Consciousness, Black Power, Profile: J. Blaine Hudson, Black Political Power

Discussion Leads: Christian Valenzuela, Amanda Moulder, Kevin Katz, John Kevill

Work Due:

1-Reading & Discussion

2-Reading Summaries

3-Draft Proposal Due Next Week: Come to class with a question and topic, along with some secondary sources that pertain to it. Use the Oviatt Library's Database, especially Worldcat and JStor, along with others such as EBSCO Host or Proquest Historical.

Question/ Topic (with explanation about why you picked this, if you have a particular reason) And remember, it needs to be a recent topic so you can find people to interview!

Primary Sources:

Interviewees

What other primary sources might be helpful?

Secondary Sources: Books & Articles (put this in bibliographic form and be choosey about the sources you select--you don't have to choose them all in the first week. You want a list of only the best for your very selective list, and for this, too, you can use book reviews)


Week #4: 13 February 2019

Oral Histories from Kentucky, Listening to Others, and Project Design

 

Reading:

1. Telling True Stories, "Name Your Subgenre," 81-96:

(Brown, Britt, Lepore, Greene, Boo, Allison)

2-Alessandro Portelli, They Say in Harlan County, 249-330

("Exodus"; "The Other America"; "Democracy and the Mines")

3. Fosl, Freedom on the Border, 186-247

("Black Consciousness, Black Power"; "Profile: J. Blaine Hudson"; "Black Political Power")

Discussion Leads: Jennifer Valdez, Weston Richardson, Eduardo Estrada

Work Due:

1-Reading and Class Discussion

2-Reading Summaries

3-Draft Proposal Due

#2/ Interviewing

Week #5: 20 February 2019

Oral Histories from Kentucky, Listening to Others, and Interviewing

Reading:

1-Alessandro Portelli, They Say in Harlan County, 331-366

("Staying Alive")

2. Fosl, Freedom on the Border, 248-262

("Conclusion")

3. Oral History and Digital Hitory, 35-132:

"Why do we call it Oral History?" and "Adventures in Sound," "I just want to Click on It to listen," "Beyond the Transcript, Notes from the field, and the Japanese American Legacy Project"

Discussion Leads: Jazz Piatt, Scott Kim, Jovany Gonzalez, Conner Clement

Work Due:

1-Reading & Class Discussion

2-Brief Reading Summaries for this week's reading

3-Proposal Critiques (one to partner and one to instructor)

Week #6: 27 February 2019

Oral Histories from Kentucky, Listening to Others, and Interviewing

Reading:

1-Oral History and Digital Hitory, 133-End:

"Densho," "Deconstruction without Consruction," "We All begin with a Stroy," "Swimming in the Exaflood," and "Oral History and the Digital Humanities"

Discussion Leads: Katherine Chisolm, Daniel Cobos, Jack Pane

Work Due:

1-Reading & Class Discussion

2-Brief Reading Summaries

3-Final Proposal Due

Week #7: 6 March 2019

Process

#3/ Transcription, Summaries, Writing

We will discuss procedure today and practice--we will meet in the computer lab if possible

Week #8: 13 March 2019

Week #9: 20 March 2019 SPRING BREAK

Week #10: 27 March 2019

No Class/ Appointments

Work Due: tba

Week #11: 3 April 2019

No Class/ Appointments

Work Due: tba

#3/ Transcription & Summaries

Week #12: 10 April 2019

back in Class!

Reading:

Reading: "Editing" in Telling True Stories, pp. 197-226.

Class Discussion, Project Progress, and Interview Summaries.

Your Interview Summaries will be due anytime between this week and Wednesday 23 November by 5 PM. You can email your summaries as an attached word file.

Week #13: 17 April 2019

Interview Summaries & Audio Due by Wednesday 11/23, 5PM. You can email them.

#4/ Telling Stories

Week #14: 24 April 2029

Work Due:

1-Project Presentations - Outlines with Presentations

2-send Audio/ Video Clip by Monday 28 November

You will have about 10-15 minutes to tell your story, and please allow time so we can hear a part of your interview--I will have the interviews ready, and will put them on our web page (from the clip you send me). Make a statement based on what you have learned, and give us some examples, including the most surprising. What was your best moment--why? (Be here both for your own story, as well as others)

Week #15: 1 May 2019

What have you found?

Work Due:

1-Project Presentations

2-send Audio/ Video Clip by Week 14

3-6-7 page Essay on Process of Oral History

You will have about 10-15 minutes to tell your story, and please allow time so we can hear a part of your interview--I will have the interviews ready, and will put them on our web page (from the clip you send me). Make a statement based on what you have learned, and give us some examples, including the most surprising. What was your best moment--why? (Be here both for your own story, as well as others)

 Week #16: 8 May 2019

Finals' Week

10 Page paper due by 5 PM, Thursday--turn in to the Department Office